LCRA promotes water conservation by awarding $171,000 for projects in central Texas

Several Central Texas communities soon will complete valuable projects that will conserve millions of gallons of water a year from the Highland Lakes, thanks to more than $171,000 in grants from the Lower Colorado River Authority.

The conservation cost-share grants, which require at least a 50 percent match in cash or in-kind services from recipients, include:

  • $6,960 to the Travis County Water Control and Improvement District-Point Venture to replace aging water lines to reduce water loss. The project is expected to save about 6 acre-feet of water from the Highland Lakes  ̶  roughly 1.95 million gallons  ̶  annually.
  • $21,228 to the Village of Briarcliff to replace more than 900 water meters with ultrasonic meters connected to a cellular network. The current meters are read manually once a month, but the new meters will automatically monitor meters hourly, helping detect leaks more quickly. The project is expected to save about 18 acre-feet of water from the Highland Lakes  ̶  roughly 6 million gallons  ̶  annually.
  • $43,479 to the City of Lago Vista to modify an existing treated effluent line to allow accumulated re-use water to be saved for future beneficial use instead of being disposed of immediately on cedar trees. The project is expected to save about 52 acre-feet of water from the Highland Lakes  ̶  roughly 17 million gallons  ̶  annually.
  • $100,000 to the Lakeway Municipal Utility District to extend an existing treated effluent line to allow more than 320 nearby homes to irrigate landscapes with treated effluent rather than potable water. The project is expected to save about 97 acre-feet of water from the Highland Lakes  ̶  roughly 32 million gallons  ̶  annually.

“Lakes Buchanan and Travis are vital water supply reservoirs for Central Texas,” said John Hofmann, LCRA executive vice president of Water. “More than a million people, plus businesses and industries rely on the Highland Lakes. Using this resource responsibly and implementing conservation projects like these helps protect our water supply.”

LCRA’s Firm Water Conservation Cost-share Program provides funding for water efficiency projects and programs established by LCRA’s firm water customers. Customers include cities, utilities, industries, irrigation and recreational water users. Projects funded through the program include converting irrigated areas using raw or potable water to recycled water, and decreasing utility system water loss, such as flushing reductions or leak detection and repair.

Applications for the next round of grants are due Sept. 1, 2018. More information is available at WaterSmart.org.

About LCRA
The Lower Colorado River Authority serves customers and communities throughout Texas by managing the lower Colorado River; generating and transmitting electric power; providing a clean, reliable water supply; and offering access to nature at more than 40 parks, recreation areas and river access sites along the Texas Colorado River, from the Hill Country to the Gulf Coast. LCRA and its employees are committed to enhancing the lives of Texans through water stewardship, energy and community services. LCRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1934. For more information, visit lcra.org

Media Contact
Clara Tuma
512–578–3292
clara.tuma@lcra.org

​​​​​Local Communities

LCRA representatives present a $6,960 grant to Travis County WCID-Point Venture for replacing aging water lines. Pictured from left to right are: Stacy Pandey, LCRA water conservation coordinator; Cristin Cecala, chief operations manager; George Russell, LCRA Board member; and Richard Welcher, technical manager.

​​​​​Local Communities

LCRA representatives present a $43,479 grant to the City of Lago Vista for modifying an existing treated effluent line. Pictured from left to right are: Eric Belaj, director of public works; George Russell, LCRA Board member; Ronald Smith, city council member; Joshua Ray, city manager; Dave Stewart, assistant director of public works; Stacy Pandey, LCRA water conservation coordinator; and David Walden, superintendent of utility operations.


Source: LCRA Business News

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