PRESS RELEASE: Fiscal Notes: Helping Foster Youths in Higher Education

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April 21, 2020 

Fiscal Notes: Helping Foster Youths in Higher Education

(AUSTIN) — As the latest edition of Fiscal Notes went to press, the coronavirus was sweeping Texas and the nation. The consequent shutdowns are having obvious impacts on Texas’ economy, specifically its businesses, employees and the many Texans facing unemployment, and on state and local governments. The Comptroller’s office is monitoring the situation closely, and our May-June issue will begin discussing the pandemic’s effects. In the meantime, Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar urges everyone who does business with the Comptroller’s office, or who has questions about how our tax functions are continuing during the outbreak, to visit our COVID-19 News page or our Virtual Field Office.

In the April issue of Fiscal Notes, we examine how the state attempts to help Texas foster children, tens of thousands of kids who face steep odds, succeed in higher education.

“Texas students in foster care are much more likely than their peers to face problems in school — and much less likely to pursue or earn a postsecondary degree after they leave the program,” Hegar said. “In Texas, those leaving foster care can pursue college tuition waivers, training vouchers, scholarship programs and other services.”

This edition also looks at ways the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) supports private enterprise while pursuing advanced technologies. Since 1962, NASA has transferred its technologies to benefit American companies and the national economy.

Fiscal Notes is available online and can be received by subscribing via the Comptroller’s website.

Fiscal Notes furthers the Comptroller’s constitutional responsibility to monitor the state’s economy and estimate state government revenues. It has been published since 1975, featuring in-depth analysis concerning state finances and original research by subject-matter experts in the Comptroller’s office.

 


Source: Texas Comptroller

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